How do wait times affect user expectations?

How do wait times affect user expectations?
How do wait times affect user expectations?

I would like to start by saying that I’m not a UI/UX expert. In fact, I don’t have a designation in this area of work nor have I worked as a designer. However, recently I’ve began to really invest my time in reading and studying user experience or UX for short, and how we as an organization can implement better fundamental principles surrounding UX for our customers.

An issue I encounter often is latency and the responsiveness of a distributed ledger-based application. Before I jump straight to the answer, let us examine this issue and its effect on user experience.

Every company wants to deliver the best experience for their customers. Experience can be measured differently from direct human interaction when ordering food at a restaurant, or through an automated teleservice when calling your cable provider, or via an interaction with an application for a software-based tech firm.

The enhanced experience needs to directly translate into fast processing, leading to minimal wait time so the user can obtain a good, service, or in our case critical data quickly.

However, experience differs based on the nature of the service, product, or platform and how it directly translates to the user’s expectations. Here at DLT Labs, our platform takes in and processes large volumes of data and provides actionable output for business decisions.

One thing I’ve learned is that wait time is not a bad thing, depending on the expectations of the platform.

We have learned that wait time is not necessarily a bad thing as the volume and sophistication of data being processed through our platform is vast.

Take Google for example. The globally recognized company prides itself on fast search results. In fact, every time you ‘google’ something, the results contain a time parameter of how long the search actually took to process.

Why is this important to Google, and their users?

Their user base is large and diverse and generally people are unwilling to wait. On the other hand look at Booking.com — a popular site used to find the best hotel rates in any given city.

If the results on a search came back as quickly as a general Google search, the user would be concerned. This is again based on expectations.

Immediate results on Booking.com would lead to users questioning the legitimacy of search — Did the search actually work? Were all the options considered? Am I receiving the best rates? Are the results predefined?

In this case, wait time actually works in favour of Booking.com — the user feels that the system took an adequate amount of time to deliver meaningful output.

At DLT Labs we are continuously looking to innovate and enhance our platform to provide the best user experience. For our customers, this means access to information and mission critical data so that they make informed business decisions.

We have gone through lengthy processes to understand our customers’ needs and expectations. Our engagement model, as part of our sales cycle includes onsite workshops where our experts work to build personas. These personas are used to design user experiences that is in line with expectations.

We have learned that wait time is not necessarily a bad thing as the volume and sophistication of data being processed through our platform is vast.

However, by no means does this mean we have settled. In fact, our platform has exceeded our customer’s expectations on experience, and we look to continue that into the next quarter.

Stay tuned, a completely new experience is coming soon.

Author — Shailen Parbhoo, DLT Labs

About the Author: Shailen leads Product Management at DLT Labs. He has varied experience in consulting as Product Manager/Business Analyst in several industries such as banking and aerospace, and has worked on high profile projects such as Apple Pay and Airplane Health Management. Throughout his career the focal point has been placed on how to bridge the needs of clients with the delivery of technology.

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DLT Labs is a global leader in Distributed Ledger Technology and Enterprise Products. To know more, head over to: https://www.dltlabs.com/

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